Mark Felt — the Man Who Brought Down the White House

0
87
mark-felt-the-man-who-brought-down-the-white-house

As controversial as Mark Felt’s contribution was in standing up for the righteous truth against the whole American democracy, this biographical film opened with mixed annotations from critics and cross-eyed hints from the rigid orthodoxies. Directed by Peter Landesman and starring Liam Neeson as Mark Felt, the movie tells the story of the infamous incidents that were exposed by Felt during the Nixon-era, officially ending his presidency. This procedural thriller has some essential lessons to preach to its audience during this presidential deficiency of ‘you-know-who’. Postmodern eras of architectural humanism and counter-culture beliefs need movies like these that are capable of stirring minimum emotions of the mass.

mark-felt-the-man-who-brought-down-the-white-house

Plot

A biographical picture, as the name suggests, the movie revolves around Mark Felt’s plight that exposed the biggest administrative unit in the word. Mr. Mark Felt published a memoir before his death in 2008, which were turned into a time appropriate, intriguingly methodical thriller by writer director Peter Landersman. In a restricted script and exposure in terms of storytelling, the director successfully rose as a brilliant presenter of minimalistic perfections. Liam Neeson for example put in his experience through his eyes and his patchy wrinkles told of a thousand stories more than words could have ever spun. A borderline period movie in its own accord, the movie leans more on adjudging the moral virtues of the government through the eyes of Felt. Being the FBI head during the Watergate scandal, he had his reaches into the roots of the administration, which eventually led to the grand expose.

mark-felt-the-man-who-brought-down-the-white-house

Cast

Liam Neeson, as always, had his strong presence on screen and portrayed the stress stricken Felt in the most appropriate way. Diane Lane is his heavy drinking wife who in the midst of her existential crisis puts forward a supportive arm to her husband. The supporting cast of Tony Goldwyn as Ed Millar, Josh Lucas as Charlie Bates and Maika Monroe as Joan Felt, all earned accolades for their respective space on screen. The subject, cast, storytelling, and importance of the movie took a subtle backseat in the dramatic hotchpotch of things. Deep Throat, the name given to Mark Felt when the real action was taking place, signifies a dark thriller without completing its destiny in the film. It is slow beyond what was needed; the intermingling personal dilemma could have been avoided in many places. Nevertheless, all the actors were brilliant and the transition between charactorial behaviors was also captured very well.

mark-felt-the-man-who-brought-down-the-white-house

The informative part and the dramatic grandeur all were brought together beautifully in this insightful venture. The difference of color tones in the White House and outside of it has its own substantial significance. But due to the insufficient clarity on nationalistic opinions or the importance of institutional impact on the public, this movie lacked a stringent element to keep the audience engaged. Any political drama needs the support of an engaging subplot irrespective of how serious it is and Mark Felt in spite of being an undoubtedly talented feature moderately fails to invoke loyal stamina in the audience.