The Eagle (2011)

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The Eagle delves into the mysterious disappearance of the Roman Ninth Legion in 140 A.D. Channing Tatum stars in this movie, based on the novel The Eagle Of The Ninth.


Based on the same legendary Ninth Legion of the Roman army as Centurion, only this time it has Channing Tatum, so it’ll blow. Essentially, both films follow different theories about why the Ninth Legion disappeared. One theory says that the legion disappeared around 117 A.D. That’s the Centurion storyline, which tells the story of Boudica and is from the point of view of those who were involved.

The Eagle of the Ninth is set about 20 years later, and tells the story of the son of the leader of the Ninth Legion who goes to find out what happened to the legion as well as retrieve the Golden Eagle, which was the emblem of the legion. All this for daddy’s approval.

We also have a few new clips from The Eagle, if you have time to watch a couple great little moments.

Trailer

The Scoop

In 2nd-Century Britain, two men – master and slave – venture beyond the edge of the known world on a dangerous and obsessive quest that will push them beyond the boundaries of loyalty and betrayal, friendship and hatred, deceit and heroism…The Roman epic adventure The Eagle is directed by Kevin Macdonald and produced by Duncan Kenworthy. Jeremy Brock has adapted the scr eenplay from Rosemary Sutcliff’s classic novel The Eagle of the Ninth.

In 140 AD, the Roman Empire extends all the way to Britain – though its grasp is incomplete, as the rebellious tribes of Caledonia (today’s Scotland) hold sway in the far North. Marcus Aquila (Channing Tatum) arrives in Britain, determined to restore the tarnished reputation of his father, Flavius Aquila. It was 20 years earlier that Rome’s 5,000-strong Ninth Legion, under the command of Flavius and carrying their golden emblem, the Eagle of the Ninth, marched north into Caledonia. They never returned; Legion and Eagle simply vanished into the mists. Angered, the Roman Emperor Hadrian ordered the building of a wall to seal off the territory; Hadrian’s Wall became the northernmost frontier of the Roman Empire – the edge of the known world.

Driven to become a brilliant soldier and now given command of a small fort in the southwest, Marcus bravely leads his troops during a siege. Commended by Rome for his bravery, yet discharged from the army because of his severe wounds, Marcus convalesces, demoralized, in the villa of his Uncle Aquila (Donald Sutherland), a retired army man. When Marcus impulsively gets a young Briton’s life spared at a gladiatorial contest, Aquila buys the Briton, Esca (Jamie Bell), to be Marcus’ slave. Marcus is dismissive of Esca, who harbors a seething hatred of all things Roman. Yet Esca vows to serve the man who has saved his life.

Hearing a rumor that the Eagle has been seen in a tribal temple in the far north, Marcus is galvanized into action, and sets off with Esca across Hadrian’s Wall. But the highlands of Caledonia are a vast and savage wilderness, and Marcus must rely on his slave to navigate the region. When they encounter ex-Roman soldier Guern (Mark Strong), Marcus realizes that the mystery of his father’s disappearance may well be linked to the secret of his own slave’s identity and loyalty – a secret all the more pressing when the two come face-to-face with the warriors of the fearsome Seal Prince (Tahar Rahim).

Movie Release Date

Release: February 11, 2011

Who’s In It?

Channing Tatum … Marcus Aquila
Mark Strong … Guern
Jamie Bell … Esca
Donald Sutherland … Aquila
Denis O’Hare … Lutorius
Tahar Rahim … Seal Prince

Interesting Fact

Based on the novel by Rosemary Sutcliff. There was also a television series called The Eagle of the Ninth based on her book in the 70’s.

Related Movies

Centurion, Gladiator, Spartacus, 300

What’s Good About It?

This looks like a really big shot for Channing Tatum, who may actually do a decent job acting this time. Donald Sutherland, Jamie Bell, and Mark Strong are usually pretty strong performers, so they should be a big help.

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Brian brings to the site 4 years of online journalism, and attitude. Brian has probably offended you in his movie previews, and for that he won't apologize. Ladies, Brian is in a committed relationship with a woman who, thankfully, doesn't read Starseeker. It is this reluctance to read his work that keeps their relationship going. God bless America.

3 COMMENTS

  1. “cool movie! even though it , it had a grade B appearance with an inexperience actor playing the lead role, but he gave enough credibility to really get into his story as a young Mel Gibson like hero.
    I looked up the tribe seigovia and found no such..
    was the movie almost totally creative non fiction?”
    I looked up the word again after rewinding to find out the correct spelling!

    SelgovaeFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

    Part of a Selgovae hillfort at Castle O’erThe Selgovae were a Brythonic tribe in Scotland, who lived in what is now the Borders. Their capital was on the North Eildon hill, near the current town of Melrose.[1] This was a large hillfort covering an area of about 40 acres.[2] It is believed that there were about 2500 people living in the fort. The Selgovae left the fort in 79 AD when the Roman army invaded the area. There are other Selgovae hillforts at Caidemuir Hill (near Peebles), Dreva Craig (near Broughton), Rubers Law (near Hawick), Whiteside Hill (near Romannobridge), Abory Hill (near Abington), Cow Castle (near Coulter), Quothquan Law (near Thankerton), Bodsberry Hill (near Crawford) and at Crawford.[2] At Tamshiell Rigg there is evidence of a walled settlement. The Roman forts at Birrens, Netherby and Bewcastle were all built in Selgovae lands, north of Hadrian’s Wall.[2]

    In the second century, the Selgovae are said to be one of the four kingdoms of ancient Scotland. By the end of the fourth century, the area had been taken over by Coel Hen and his kingdom of North Britain.

    It’s cool to realize that they were a real tribe… perhaps these picts bred into the main gene pool of present day Scots almost 2 millennia later??

  2. I looked up the word again after rewinding to find out the correct spelling!

    SelgovaeFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

    Part of a Selgovae hillfort at Castle O’erThe Selgovae were a Brythonic tribe in Scotland, who lived in what is now the Borders. Their capital was on the North Eildon hill, near the current town of Melrose.[1] This was a large hillfort covering an area of about 40 acres.[2] It is believed that there were about 2500 people living in the fort. The Selgovae left the fort in 79 AD when the Roman army invaded the area. There are other Selgovae hillforts at Caidemuir Hill (near Peebles), Dreva Craig (near Broughton), Rubers Law (near Hawick), Whiteside Hill (near Romannobridge), Abory Hill (near Abington), Cow Castle (near Coulter), Quothquan Law (near Thankerton), Bodsberry Hill (near Crawford) and at Crawford.[2] At Tamshiell Rigg there is evidence of a walled settlement. The Roman forts at Birrens, Netherby and Bewcastle were all built in Selgovae lands, north of Hadrian’s Wall.[2]

    In the second century, the Selgovae are said to be one of the four kingdoms of ancient Scotland. By the end of the fourth century, the area had been taken over by Coel Hen and his kingdom of North Britain.”

    It’s cool to realize that they were a real tribe… perhaps these picts bred into the main gene pool of present day Scots almost 2 millennia later??

  3. cool movie! even though it , it had a grade B appearance with an inexperience actor playing the lead role, but he gave enough credibility to really get into his story as a young Mel Gibson like hero.
    I looked up the tribe seigovia and found no such..
    was the movie almost totallly creative non fiction?

Comments are closed.